About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
CSPAN2 12
CSPAN 6
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
KQED (PBS) 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
WETA 3
CNN 1
CNNW 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
that perhaps is even more fundamentally dangerous for britain and much of the rest of europe than taming the e.u.'s superstate tendencies. this is the problem of attitudes and how the institutional expression in the economy. because as i illustrate in "becoming europe" the prevailing conviction across most of europe is that the state is the primary way in which we address common problems and meet our responsibilities and obligations to our fellow citizens. that such obligations might be realized outside the realm of politics doesn't apparently occurred to large numbers of european political leaders including i have to say a considerable number of the center-right european politicians. so in this regard i have often wondered what -- would think if he read a particularly important book that was written 180 years ago by one of his compatriots. because although it's about the new world, democracy in america was sent written for an american audience. alexis de tocqueville's intended audience was europe. so i think you would be astonished to learn how the americans observed by de tocqueville dealt with p
move in a couple of weeks to, i hope, the negotiations on the e.u. budget. .. in the last 12 months, we have come back to the market. can you tell us a little bit more about the structural economic reforms. particularly repairing the banking system, which i feel is the exemption of growth. >> yes, two years ago when the administration was elected, it actually lasted 250,000 jobs for the two years prior to that. reputation is in shreds around the world. our banks are dysfunctional. there is a complete sense of hopelessness and despair and disillusionment. now, gordon was elected with a very keen mind. we have a strategy and a plan that works. the banks are being recapitalize and restructured and have been back in the market as this program began in 2013. there are double-digit figures and our people have had to take really serious challenges. his government made really serious decisions or if it is an example of the government works and understands the patience of people, putting up with these changes in the greater picture of things. now, we expect to do better. but we cannot do without
in western and north western africa. they are considered or seen by the e.u., france, as the least problematic state of the sierra. the number of youth recruited into al-qaeda so far remains very small, and they attack on soil, lack sophistication. capabilities are extremely limited, and it's affiliated networks are disorganized and weak today. the government's aggressive pursuit and imprisonment pursuit of violence extremists temporarily disrupted the growth, but like other countries, niger, are faced with the challenge of ensuring control over the borders. i mean, mori tan ya shares a long border with mali, 2240 kilometers. it's even more than algeria which it shares 1300 kilometers a border with mali. border management plays a key role in counter in all forms of smuggling and, also, as i said the fighters in northern mali, so they have adopted an aggressive approach to fight violent extremists, more than the neighbors, definitely more than mali. for example, they equipped its airport, three airports with i.t. systems. it has full passport readers, it has built 27 # -- 27 posts t
as a terrorist organization. the second thing, in 2006 you were one of 12 senators who refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the
to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard a terrorist organization, being one of two on two occasions to vote against sanctions that this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you made about palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all that together. that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that. because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as a terrorist organizations. >> if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, to vote to say that the iranian revolutionary guard was a terrorist organization. would you still vote no? >> the reason i voted no to start with... >> well i know why, you told me that. my question is would you reconsider and would you vote yes this time? or would you still vote no? >> times change. i recognize that and, yes, i would reconsider. >> well, t
the revolutionary peoples liberation hardy front, and it's on the u.s. and eu terrorist list. very anti-american, very anti-nato. they attacked turkish military and security installations. at some point that switched and they went after u.s. diplomats and u.s. military. they were particularly active during the gulf war, and they've killed dozens of people since the '70s. they finance themselves by robberies and extortion. experts don't rule out they may have been subcontracted by another group. in fact, i was reading the newspapers a short while ago, shep. there was an article that said this was a splinter group of a larger organization backed by iran and syria. now, we don't have any confirmation of that, but again, there's always the possibility that they were subcontracted by someone else, the u.s. saying that they're following turkey's lead at this point but so far, turkey is just saying that it was this leftist group. >> shepard: amy kellogg in london. thanks so much. experts call ankara one of the safest cities in the region but consider turkey's neighbors, iran to the east, syri
's some talks coming up now in kazakhstan of all places in late february involving the eu, the united states and the iranians. and so this is going to be a venue in which people are going to be able to see to a certain extent how serious iran is about negotiating on limits on its nuclear program. there hasn't been negotiations for some significant period of ti. and this is an opportunity to test the iranians. i think this initial round is not going to prove much but certainly over the next six months, i think there will be an ample opportunity to see if there is an intent on the iranian part to reach some sort of compromise. >> rose: leon panetta and others have said the following. we have no information that there's been a decision on the part of the iranian government and the most influential people there to builds a nuclear weapon and a missile that will deliver it. what do they mean when they say that? >> well, i can't really speak for them but i think it's pretty clear that iran has made the decision to have a nuclear weapons program. and there's really nothing el that explains
. this is something that is totally in line with the e.u. inspiration of social market economy, and we are lead by, first of all securing the sustainability of public finances in the long-term, including a pension reform, and also looking at the de facto for growth. infrastructures, long delayed in italy, we have simplified the process of building infrastructures and injected in acceleration on those. then the functioning of the markets and that we have introduced more competition for example, in the leader of professions, like to call themselves -- but many pressures to become liberal. and in the separation between gas production and gas distribution, to give you another example. all in the shopping hours and the commerce sector. also a lot of significant indication concerning -- of course this needs to be continued and one issue about the italian elections in which i will not go unless -- here today is which political configuration is more in line with the need to sustain these structures. but i believe that -- not even the largest countries can really keep a momento for growth or resume a momen
because countries in the eu or even the euro zone are very, very different to what germany or portugal or greece or italy to the east, it's a very, very different situation, in that, that means we need also all a bit of time, education, infrastructure investment, all this is needed so that they have, let's say, a growth perspective for the next years. >> thank you. take another round of questions. >> [inaudible] >> the federal reserve hester medical increased its balance sheet since the great recession. about 20, 30 years, it didn't very all that much. suddenly very large increase. is the federal reserve comfortable in that it has an exit strategy so that we don't have either major inflation -- [inaudible] or major losses from purchasing assets and resale trying to bring back this money. thank you. >> a very quick to comment. [inaudible] i'm very happy to american colleagues. i think that we in europe -- [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> and in the back. did you have your hand up? >> that's what we do. any other questions? okay. is the one back you? >> i'm not an economist. i'm a
by regulation under the legislation, and then we have e.u. sanctions. >> right. >> and, indeed, sanctions that other people follow that are mandated by the security council. the e.u. seems to be, on this issue, potentially more flexible than we are. and so there is operating room there. there is operating room in not putting more sanctions on that could be helpful as an initial step. and, obviously, that would be important. each one of these the president would have to explain that he's getting value. that the europeans could take sanctions off central banks and petroleum, for example. that we could do things that i think are absolutely necessary. we have had a longstanding policy of not sanctioning food and medicine for good reasons. and when i was in the security council, the first sanctions on iraq after their invasion of kuwait we made it scrupulously careful. that got all screwed up in oil for food. and i don't want to spend time here talking about that, but -- >> many. [inaudible] >> that was a perfect example of how things could go wrong. but the fundamental basis was the right bas
, under the legislation, and then we have the e.u. sanctions and others that people follow mandated by the security council. the e.u. seems to be more flexible than we are, said it is operating room there. there is operating room in not putting more sanctions on the that could be helpful as an initial step. that would be important. each one of these the president would have to explain he is getting value, that the europeans to take sanctions off central banks and petroleum, for reasonable. that we could do things that i think are absolutely necessary. we have had a longstanding policy of not sanctioning food and medicine for good reasons, and when i was in the security council, in iraq, we made it carefully. that got screwed up and oil for food, and i did not want to talk about that, but that was an example of how things could go wrong. the basis was the right basis and that even in the worst of all possible situations, you cannot punish the population, particularly, for the sins of their leaders' summit if they did not choose the leaders. we have a situation where we have brought b
sanctions is by legislation, under the legislation, and then we have the e.u. sanctions and others that people follow mandated by the security council. the e.u. seems to be more flexible than we are, so there is operating room there. there is operating room in not putting more sanctions on the table could be helpful as an initial step. that would be important. each one of these the president would have to explain he is getting value, that the europeans to take sanctions off central banks and petroleum. that we could do things that i think are absolutely necessary. we have had a longstanding policy of not sanctioning food and medicine for good reasons, and when i was in the security council, in iraq we made them carefully. that got screwed up in oil for food, and i do not want to talk about that, but that was an example of how things could go wrong. the basis was the right basis and that even in the worst of all possible situations, you cannot punish the population, particularly, for the sins of their leaders, especially if they did not choose the leaders. we have a situation where
department focused on energy diplomacy as well as new partnerships like the u.s. e.u. energy council we work intensively with the iraqis to support their energy sector because it is critical not only to their economy but their stability as well. we have significantly intensifiintensifi ed efforts to resolve energy disputes from the south china sea to the eastern mediterranean to keep the world's energy market stable. now this has been helped quite significantly by the increase in our own domestic production. it's no accident that is as the iranian oil has gone off-line because of our sanctions other sources have come on line so iran cannot in a fit from increased prices. then there is human rights and our support for democracy and the rule of law. levers of power and values we cannot afford to ignore. in the last century the united states where it led the world in recognizing universal rights exist and that governments are obligated to protect them. now we have placed ourselves at the frontline of today's emerging battle like the fight to defend the human rights of the lgbt communities aroun
-year investigation that has been going on in the eu and to its search business there, the dominance of the google search engine. also helping the stock move higher today, brooke, wireless carriers activating a million android devices per day, giving apple a run for its money. >> good for those folks who got in when getting was good in '04. alison kosik, thank you. >>> broad picture, let's talk to jill schlessinger. jill, i knew i liked you. i was reading a piece today where you quoted the grateful dead in talking about the ups and downs of the dow jones. give me that line. >> it has been a long, strange trip. come on, now. just think about this, in the summer of 2007, we first crossed 14,000. and that was well before anyone really, the broad public understood we're about to become sucked into the precipice of disaster by the financial sector. so, of course, 14,000 doesn't feel quite as good this time around and frankly a lot of retail investors have not yet gotten back into the market after these last five or six bruising years, who could blame them. it has been agonizing. >> but, here's my debbi
refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, i did vote against it. >> i
. tell your story about how family and medical leave has helped you, how much more eu could have been helped had not had the financial stresses that i am sure exist in families when they have to take unpaid leave. asked them both to amend the family and medical leave so more people can take it for more reasons and how much you need paid leaves. host: what exactly is a national partnership? caller: we are a national advocacy group that works on access to quality health care, that works on issues like workplace fairness and to ensure workers can be responsible family members. this is why we are advocates for expanding medical leave. it it is a labor of love for us to help working families secure the health care they need. we are a nonprofit organization that receives donations that are tax deductible from foundations and individuals. host: you can go to their web site nationalpartnerships.org. caller: i want, i think it is great the work you have done. it is great you're able to use that. about 10 years ago i had a 16 year old daughter that had a dui. i found that she was involved in dr
is a challenge t to all of us on both sides of the 50eu8, bot-- bothsides of the aisle, bs of the rotunda, to take the student debt crisis seriously. madam president, i yield the floor and i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: william quorum call:
a letter asking the e.u. to declare hezbollah a terrorist . >> one minute remaining. >> the terrorist organization in 2007 while killing our soldiers in iraq. he refused to sign a letter to president george w. bush talking -- he said to engage direct, talks with the government of iran. he was for that telling bush to do it. he voted against the iranian sanctions. he was one of two senators who failed to sign a letter to president clinton showing unconditional support for the state of israel. i would argue his record when it comes to iran and vale and statements he made put him well out of the mainstream and "the washington post" is right on the fridge. and now is the time to have somebody on the fringe of iran and israel serving as secretary of defense for the reason. ly vote no. debate should continue and when we get back unless there's a bomb shell. thank you. >> thank you. i yield the floor. senator from michigan. >> yield five minutes for the senator of wfd. >> senator from west virginia. >>. >> madam president. proudly support chuck hagel for secretary of defense. if he can make
in what our total costs are for the two different 250eu7stypes of employees. so when we talk about a sequester of taking $85 billion i've just given you over $85 billion over ten years and just by looking at a few programs. so when we hear the number and we think about the federal government being twice the size it was 11 years ago and that we're 2% higher in -- 27% fire terms of discretionary than even if sequester goes through as it actually still year. so it's important that wecan people about where we are on these projects. let me gorks for a second, talk about -- we put outlled the waste book. we put it out every year. we gave 100 examples of how tax dollars were wasted last year. $450,000 for on used aret in my state. $325,000 for robot squirrels. this is a grant that was issued to study what we already know about robotic squirrels and their inches interactions with rattlesnakes. i can't see that that's a priority for us when we're running deficits that we need to be spending money on that type of research. we spend $91 million a year giving a -- you won't believe this -- cha
u.s. emissions are actually down, i think it is 8%. eu emissions are down like 9%. but chinese emissions are up 30%. look at, look at where the coal is being burned. i think in five years india is supposed to become the second largest burner of coal right behind china. so the global picture on emissions is, if the national one wasn't enough to make you cry, i mean, just sort of think globally as sort of where we're going, you know? so, that's the crying part. and you asked me bright spots so. i mean there actually are, there actually are some, relax, i mean, the news, car standards that were just promulgated will double fuel economy by 2020 five. california is moving ahead and i think is a real bright spot. rggi is strengthening their targets. that's a bright spot. the cap-and-trade in australia looks like, i mean, who knows, another government might fall over their program here but it's a bright spot. they have got a plan. they have got a program. south korea is thinking about instituting emissions trading. china has seven sort of experiments around the country looking at emis
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)